Zur deutschen Seite.
(Deutsche und englische Artikel,
deutsche Oberfläche.)

Read the German page.
(German and English articles,
with German interface.)

Read the English page.
(Only English articles,
with English interface.)

Zur englischen Seite.
(Nur englische Artikel,
englische Oberfläche.)

Artikel mit dem Stichwort ‘TEZUKA Osamu’

Let’s Play: Glory of Heracles III Part 25

Mittwoch, 3. September, 2014

I keep mentioning this game in my articles and have used several sample movie scenes of it as well. But one really needs to have experienced the game in full to appreciate its quality. If you haven’t been spoiled yet (or even if you have), watch this series of youtube videos first before you read any of the related articles. I’m planning a weekly release schedule.

If you haven’t seen it yet, start with part 1. Or better yet, play it yourself. There is a fan translation patch available at romhacking.net which I used for this Let’s Play.

Why do the ship carpenters in Labat refuse to build or even repair ships? And what plan to save the world will Uranos come up with?

(mehr …)

Reality vs. Myth: Final Fantasy XV

Samstag, 20. Juli, 2013

At this year’s e3 Final Fantasy Versus XIII was finally renamed to Final Fantasy XV but the story and concept of the game haven’t changed: it confronts myth with reality, challenges itself to be a fantasy based in reality. Not exactly a new approach for the series since Kazushige NOJIMA started writing many of its most successful installments starting with Final Fantasy VII but especially pronounced in the newest Final Fantasy.

Back in 2008, in the Cloud Message book this concept was illustrated by render artworks like this one:

versus01

versus02

A city scenery at night, lit only by the windows of the large skyscrapers, the rows of street lamps and the cars driving through the road at the bottom of the render artwork. And floating above the street the figure of Stella, the female lead character of the game, visible through what seems to be rift tearing through the canvas of the game world. There are more artworks like this one in which the game world is torn open to show someone from another place, another reality maybe.

What is noteworthy in this artwork though is that there seems to be a source work that is referenced here by the scene shown. It’s very reminiscent of the fold out cover of the Deluxe Edition of the first volume of Pluto, a modern remake of a classic Astro Boy story.

pluto02

Aside from the tunnel that is missing in the CLOUD message artwork, the scenery is very similar. But instead of Stella appearing through a rift there is an actual opening in the paper in the shape of the silhouette of Astro Boy’s head, which served as the cover artwork for the original TEZUKA story Naoki URASAWA retells in Pluto.

(mehr …)

Electric Pinocchio IV: The Origin

Sonntag, 11. Dezember, 2011

What was it like to work with director Yoshinori Kitase?

I have been working with him since Final Fantasy V. When he joined Square, he told me he initially wanted to become a film director, but that he thought this would be impossible in Japan. The previous version of Final Fantasy could be called puppet shows compared to this one. It’s a real film requiring innovative effects and various camera angles. His experience studying cinematography and in making his own films has contributed a lot to the making of the game. He is the director of this game. (From an interview with Final Fantasy VII producer SAKAGUCHI Hironobu.)

SAKAGUCHI comparing the Final Fantasy games previous to VII to puppet shows is interesting both when looking at the plot twists outlined in the last installment of this series of articles and when looking at the in game character presentation. FFVII indeed applies many cinematic techniques which hadn’t been possible in the predecessors but the characters themselves look more like puppets than ever, a fact that was „remedied“ in the next sequel, Final Fantasy VIII, where the characters for the first time are realistically proportioned at all times.

Bunraku

I have drawn connections to the one particular Western puppet that is the namesake for this series of articles but of course the Japanese have their own puppet tradition that predates any influence Pinocchio could have had. The traces of Pinocchio we find in the works presented here mix with this older tradition and it’s time to have a look at bunraku, the traditional Japanese puppet theater.

Chūshingura

As we can see in these youtube videos, the movement of the puppets is very life like but the facial expressions are lacking animation mostly. FFVII has a similar presentation and aesthetic, using very fluid motion compared to the 2D sprites of earlier FFs but hardly animating the facial expressions (except in some more detailed pre-rendered cutscenes), which was the most important way to express emotions in the 2D FFs. Instead body language is emphasized as in bunraku plays.

Bunraku players have to train ten years as the feet before moving up to controlling the left arm. Another ten years before they finally „level up“ to become the main actor who controls the right arm. (from a Japanese TV show about bunraku)

The themes of the bunraku literary tradition also found their way into FFVII. One of the most popular bunraku pieces, the Chūshingura, tells of the 47 rōnin of Akō who follow their lord into death, by having their revenge on the daimyō who ordered him to die. This story is heaviliy entangled with the ideas of bushidō, the way of the samurai, being loyal to your master and prepared to die for them.1 Of course it also questions where this loyalty lies exactly, to one’s immediate lord or the lord of one’s lord. As it favors one’s immediate lord it can also inspire rebellion so the events portrayed in this story weren’t exactly welcomed by the rulers of the country. All these bushidō values are questioned in FFVII, the game has the player confront a part of their tradition by turning them into a bunraku puppet and ultimately dispenses with some of these traditional ideas.

The birth of Tetsuwan Atom

Cloud being manufactured to be a substitute for Sephiroth (although he ends up being one for Zack, by his own choice), him becoming an electronic puppet, this echoes the great superhero classic of post-war Japanese comics: Tetsuwan Atomu (Atom with the Iron Arm, 1952) or Astroboy, as he’s called outside Japan, was a substitute for Dr. Tenma’s son who died in a car crash. In this manga TEZUKA Osamu continues to draw upon concepts from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927) which had already inspired his earlier work of the same name (1949). That one also had a robot protagonist but only in Tetsuwan Atomu the robot became a substitute for a deceased family member. Instead of the wife Hel it became the son Tobio that was „resurrected“ as a robot. But like Cloud by Hojo, Atom is judged to be a failure by his father Dr. Tenma and is discarded accordingly.

Hyakkimaru’s father sacrifices his son for his ambition (from Dororo)

One of TEZUKA’s later works, Dororo (1968), set in the sengoku era of the warring states, reimagines Atom’s story in the past rather than in a sci-fi future. The hero of the story, Hyakkimaru, is a pre-modern cyborg, born without 48 of his body parts claimed by demons who grant his father rulership over Japan in exchange. Hyakkimaru’s missing organs and limbs are replaced with prosthetics which make him actually stronger than any human but yet he seeks out the demons to reclaim his lost organs. Every time he defeats one of them a superhuman ability granted by mechanics is lost and replaced by an ordinary biological one. In a reversal of typical bildungsroman and RPG narrative Hyakkimaru actually grows weaker by seeking to become the human he was never allowed to be.

In this regard Hyakkimaru’s goal resembles that of Pinocchio who als wanted to become an actual human. It still is a bildungsroman in the true sense of the word, growing up to become an adult (or human, as children are treated as objects in the Pinocchio narrative). The story of Dororo ends prematurely before Hyakkimaru achieves this goal though. His sidekick Dororo, after which the manga is named, drops out of the story when she is revealed to be a girl cross dressing as a boy,2 Fußnotenauszug: Gender ambiguity abounds in other works cited here as well. Atom’s predecessor Micchi, hero of TEZUKA’s Metropolis, had a switch to change his gender at will. Cloud cross dresses as a girl to rescue Tifa from a brothel. And of course Pino in Wonder Project J is succeeded by a female version Josetto, just one of many female robots in Japanese comics, Gally and Arale having been our firs... with Hyakkimaru continuing his quest alone, his remaining bildungsroman untold in the pages of the manga.

  1. Of course it also questions where this loyalty lies exactly, to one’s immediate lord or the lord of one’s lord. As it favors one’s immediate lord it can also inspire rebellion so the events portrayed in this story weren’t exactly welcomed by the rulers of the country. []
  2. Gender ambiguity abounds in other works cited here as well. Atom’s predecessor Micchi, hero of TEZUKA’s Metropolis, had a switch to change his gender at will. Cloud cross dresses as a girl to rescue Tifa from a brothel. And of course Pino in Wonder Project J is succeeded by a female version Josetto, just one of many female robots in Japanese comics, Gally and Arale having been our first examples. []

Zeichentrickgott Walt Disney und sein größter Held, Micky Maus

Dienstag, 30. November, 2010

Micky und Oswald

Mit Micky Epic erscheint die Tage eine Spieleperle, die mit Animationsfilm und Videospiel zwei Medien vereint und beide an ihre frühen Anfänge zurückführt. Micky wird mit dem Schicksal einiger seiner Toonkollegen konfrontiert, die es anders als er nicht in die Geschichtsbücher geschafft haben und in Vergessenheit geraten sind. Motive und Figuren stammen aus den ganz frühen Werken Disneys, von Oswald the Lucky Rabbit über die ersten Schwarzweißfilme seines heute immer noch bekannten Nachfolgers Micky Maus bis hin zu dessen späteren farbigen Kurzfilmen. Thematisch oft düsterer als man das heute von Micky Maus gewohnt ist, aber gerade deswegen interessant.

Walt Disney gehört mit seinem Auftreten während der 20er Jahre nicht nur zu den Pionieren des Zeichentrickfilms, sondern des Mediums Film allgemein, prägte es in seinen frühen Jahren. Er war dabei, als die ersten Ton- und Farbfilme produziert wurden, und machte diese neuen Technologien einem großen Publikum schmackhaft. Zwar setzt er mit gezeichneten Bildern auf eine aufwendigere Methode als der die Wirklichkeit abbildende fotografierte Film, doch eignet sich diese besonders für die fantastischen Stoffe, mit denen Disney sein Publikum faszinierte. Disneys Einfluss ist bis heute weltweit spürbar, zwar werden in seinem Namen kaum noch Zeichentrickfilme produziert, dafür aber Unterhaltung in allen Medien und Genres. Am bekanntesten ist er jedoch nach wie vor für seine Trickfilmklassiker und seinen Star, Micky Maus.

Professor: Die wissenschaftliche Bezeichnung für dieses Tier ist Mickeymouse Waltdisniney! Generalinspektor: Aha. Sagt mir gar nichts. (Aus TEZUKA Osamus Metropolis, 1949.)

Natürlich hat Disney auch in den Werken der ihm folgenden Trickfilmschaffenden Spuren hinterlassen, so finden sich schon Einflüsse in den frühen Comics des japanischen Nachkriegscomic- und -trickfilmpioniers TEZUKA Osamu. Dieser bediente sich für seine längeren Storycomics der Techniken nicht nur des Zeichentrickfilms sondern des Kinos allgemein, mit dynamischen Perspektiven, die den eigentlich statischen Bildern bereits Leben einhauchten. In Metropolis, einem seiner Frühwerke, das dem Fritz-Lang-Klassiker das Motiv des menschenähnlichen Roboters entlehnte und Grundlage für seinen späteren Held Astro Boy (Tetsuwan atomu) war, taucht auch eine riesengroße Mäusegattung (siehe rechts) auf, die dort für einige Seiten Unruhe stiftet. Später machte er seinen Traum war und folgte auch im Trickfilm in die Fußstapfen seines großen Vorbilds, heute wird er zu Recht als japanischer Disney und Gott des Comics (manga no kami-sama) bezeichnet.

Mittlerweile wird der Zeichentrickfilm zunehmend vom computergenerierten Animationsfilm verdrängt, eine Entwicklung, die eng verbunden ist mit dem des Mediums Videospiel, in dem viele Techniken dieser Neuerfindung einer alten Kunst ihren Ursprung haben. Noch mehr als beim Zeichentrickfilm, der noch heute durch zahlreiche japanische Vertreter auch im Kino am Leben erhalten wird, hat Japan bei den Videospielen eine entscheidende Rolle gespielt. Und die Comictradition TEZUKAs schlägt sich auch dort nieder, Capcoms Roboterheld Megaman (in Japan Rockman) erinnert nicht von ungefähr an TEZUKAs Astro Boy.

Die Spieleschaffenden in Japan sind sich aber auch durchaus der Ursprünge ihrer Zeichentrickhelden bewusst und Capcom schuf mit Magical Quest eine der gelungeneren Umsetzungen eines Disneystoffes im Medium Spiel. Der Disney-Konzern setzte mit gutem Grund auf japanisches Know-How beim Erobern des neuen Mediums, hatte doch der große Star des Videospielwelt, Nintendos Mario, in den 90er Jahren in Punkto Erkennungswert seinem Vorgänger Micky Maus auch in dessen Heimat den Rang abgelaufen.1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mario#cite_ref-75 Neue Technologien schaffen neue Helden und die alten Hasen müssen schon versuchen, mit dem Lauf der Dinge mitzuhalten, wenn sie nicht von ihnen verdrängt werden wollen, wie das bereits Oswald durch Micky widerfahren war. Also hüpfte Micky in Capcoms „Jump ’n‘ Run“-Spiel wie Mario durch horizontal scrollende Level.

Auch Nintendo musste sich dem technologischen Fortschritt beugen und von teuren Modulen auf das günstigere Massenmedium der optischen Disks wechseln, leider etwas spät und mittlerweile vom ehemaligen Verbündeten Sony ausgebotet. Dieser entwickelte sein geplantes CD-Addon für das Super Nintendo stattdessen zu einer eigenen Spielekonsole weiter, die optisch und namenstechnisch stärker an die Nintendo-Tradition anknüpfte als Nintendos eigene neue Konsole, das N64. Konservativ und progressiv zugleich, was für das N64 in der Kombination Module und wegweisende 3D-Grafik nicht klappte, gelang der Playstation mit günstigem Speichermedium. Dieses ermöglichte auch das Abspielen von vorab gespeichterten Filmsequenzen, die zwar weniger interaktiv waren, aber auch die computeranimierten Trickfilme aus dem Disneystudio Pixar vorwegnahmen, das Disneys eigener Trickfilmschmiede starke Konkurrenz machte.

So ist es nicht verwunderlich, dass Disneys nächstes Videospiel-Großprojekt bei Squaresoft entstand, die mit computeranimierten Filmen in Spieleform entscheidend zum Erfolg der Playstation beitrugen. Mit der auf CDs gespeicherten Grafikpracht von Final Fantasy VII konnte trotz besserer Technik kein Spiel auf dem N64 mithalten. Nintendos ehemaliger Topspielelieferant machte so Sony zum Thronfolger und durfte auf dessen zweiter Playstation mit Kingdom Hearts japanische RPG-Stories und abendfüllende Disneyfilmwelten vereinen. Man spielt Sora, eine originale Squarefigur, die optisch auch aus Final Fantasy stammen könnte. Begleitet wird er von Donald und Goofy und bereist die Welten aus bekannten Disney-Kinofilmen, auf der Suche nach dem verschwundenen König Micky.

Immer bessere Grafik, das schien das Erfolgsrezept der Zukunft zu sein, doch Nintendo überraschte alle mit einem unwahrscheinlichen Comeback, indem sie mit intuitiver Bewegungssteuerung auf Innovationen abseits der simplen grafischen Aufwertung der ewig selben Spiele setzten. Dementsprechend kommt der neueste Disney-Toptitel Micky Epic wieder für eine Nintendo-Konsole und im Gegensatz zu den beiden oben erwähnten Adaptionen diesmal von einem westlichen Entwickler. Diese haben ebenfalls ein Comeback erlebt, durch verstärkten Einsatz auf den kommerziell aussichtsreicheren TV-Konsolen haben sich PC-typische Genres auch dort etabliert und laufen den japanischen Topspielen mehr und mehr den Rang ab. Lediglich Nintendo scheint einen völlig anderen Geschmack zu bedienen und feiert größere Erfolge als je zuvor. Dementsprechend setzt Disney auf die beiden Gewinner dieser Generation, Hardwareentwickler Nintendo und westliche Spielestudios.

Warren Spector, der sich unter anderem mit Deus Ex auf dem PC einen Namen machen konnte, legt hier seinen ersten Konsolenexklusivtitel vor. Seine Neuinterpretation des Micky-Maus-Mythos ist eine Geschichtsstunde des Trickfilms, zitiert alte Klassiker und thematisiert den ewigen Konflikt zwischen Alt und Neu. Mickys Charakter  ist dabei bei weitem nicht so flach wie sein Toondesign, wie in vielen neueren Spielen üblich kann der Spieler als Micky moralische Entscheidungen treffen, statt simplem Gut oder Böse ist man aber etwas subtiler entweder schöpferisch mit Farbe tätig oder eben zerstörend mit ätzendem Verdünner. Beides sind für das Vorankommen notwendige Werkzeuge, doch ab und zu hat man die freie Wahl, eine Situation eher mit Farbe oder mit Verdünner zu bewältigen und so seinen eigenen Präferenze Ausdruck zu verleihen.

Schon im Vorspann tritt Micky eher als Störenfried auf, von einem Spiegel2 Micky ist wie zu sehen beim Lesen von Lewis Carolls Buch Alice Through the Looking Glass eingeschlafen. Dieses Buch diente auch einem Micky-Maus-Cartoon namens Thru the Mirror als Inspiration, der hier zitiert wird. Vor kurzem verfilmte Tim Burton diese Fortsetzung des vielfach bearbeiteten Kinderbuchklassikers. in das Labor eines Zauberers gelockt, spielt er mit dessen Kreation herum, malt sich selbst in seine Welt. Und als sich sein Abbild als schrecklicher Schatten gegen ihn richtet, versucht er es schnell wieder auszulöschen, verwüstet dabei aber nur die Welt, die der Magier für vergessene Trickfilmhelden3 Dieses Setting hat auch einiges gemein mit Captain Rainbow für Wii. geschaffen hat. Das Phantom lernt stattdessen selbst Verdünner einzusetzen und setzt die von Micky begonnene Verwüstung fort. Dementsprechend muss Micky sich und seinen Opfern erst wieder beweisen, dass er tatsächlich ein Held ist und kein bösartiges Phantom.

Das Spiel verbindet gekonnt Trickfilm- und Videospielelemente. Im Kern ist es so wie Capcoms SNES-Vertreter ein Jump ’n‘ Run, ausladende Sprachausgabe und langatmige Filmsequenzen wie im Action-RPG Kingdom Hearts sucht man hier vergebens, stattdessen darf man fast ständig selbst mit den Filmwelten auf vielfältige Arten interagieren. Die Missionsstruktur lässt dem Spieler über die zwingend zu treffenden Entscheidungen hinaus viele Freiheiten. Das Spiel deckt so fast alle modernen Standards des Spieldesigns ab und es ließen sich viele Vergleiche zu anderen Spielen anstellen, doch hat es vielleicht am meisten gemein mit Super Mario Sunshine. Auch dort musste man den Ruf des Helden retten, der wie die als Bühne dienende tropische Ferieninsel von einem Mario-Imitator beschmutzt wurde. Allerdings kann man dort nur die Graffitis des bösen Marios wegwaschen und nicht wie in Epic Micky ganze Objekte erschaffen oder zerstören. Micky Epic ist eben auch eine Göttersimulation, ein typisch westliches Genre aus dem Computersektor, also Spectors Metier.

Trotzdem, so ähnlich wie Micky Epic würde sich auch die Wasserpumpe aus Super Mario Sunshine auf der Wii steuern. Einfach mit der Fernbedienung zielen und mit dem Knopf Wasser bzw. Farbe und Verdünner verspritzen. Und so wie Sunshine die Waage zwischen frei erkundbaren 3D-Umgebungen und 2D-Retroabschnitten mit klarer Zielführung hielt, sind in Micky Epic die 3D-Areale durch Filmleinwände verbunden, die als 2D-Level gespielt werden können. Wie in Sunshine verzichtet man in diesen auf die innovativen Werkzeuge, zielbare Pinselfarbe und Verdünner sind für die 3D-Abschnitte reserviert. Der Wechsel von 2D zu 3D ist in beiden Medien, Film und Spiel, ein ganz entscheidender.

Das ganze Spiel macht unheimlich viel Spaß und zeugt von einem tiefen Verständnis der beiden Traditionen, die es verbindet. Kindgerecht aber nicht kindisch, düster aber nicht hoffnungslos, man kann es wirklich uneingeschränkt jedem empfehlen.

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mario#cite_ref-75 []
  2. Micky ist wie zu sehen beim Lesen von Lewis Carolls Buch Alice Through the Looking Glass eingeschlafen. Dieses Buch diente auch einem Micky-Maus-Cartoon namens Thru the Mirror als Inspiration, der hier zitiert wird. Vor kurzem verfilmte Tim Burton diese Fortsetzung des vielfach bearbeiteten Kinderbuchklassikers. []
  3. Dieses Setting hat auch einiges gemein mit Captain Rainbow für Wii. []